Don’t get caught speeding – it will cost more than the fine

Don’t get caught speeding – it will cost more than the fine

By John Grant

The police have announced a "no exception" policy on the enforcement of speed limits this weekend with a promise that every driver who exceeds the limit by 4 km/hr they catch will be ticketed.

This follows a disastrous death toll over the recent Easter weekend when 12 people died over that holiday weekend. The Queens birthday weekend last year wasn't much better with 10 deaths.

If you are one of those who are caught speeding, or any other moving traffic offences, then the implications can spread further than just the cost of the ticket.

Your insurer will want to know and it may well have an influence your future insurability.

Insurers want to know that the drivers they insure are good risks. Therefore factors like serial speeders and especially where a license is suspended will very likely have an impact when you next apply or renew your policy.

Your insurer will want to know about the traffic infringements and if the record is bad they will either decline insurance, or if they are willing to offer terms, then they could require a premium hike or and excess hike, or both premiums and excesses may be increased.

Drivers caught speeding on a regular basis are getting special attention from insurers. If you accumulate sufficient demerit points to have your license suspended for a period, then be prepared for your insurer to significantly toughen the cost of your car insurance.

We know of at least one insurer who will increase the excess by $50 for every minor offence and $100 or more for serious offences. Therefore five speeding tickets and a suspended license could see your $400 standard excess going up to $750 or higher.

 

We welcome your help to improve our coverage of this issue. Any examples or experiences to relate? Any links to other news, data or research to shed more light on this? Any insight or views on what might happen next or what should happen next? Any errors to correct?

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