Fast track consent sought for 3,000 new homes at Hobsonville in Auckland

Fast track consent sought for 3,000 new homes at Hobsonville in Auckland

A proposed development of up to 3,000 new homes at Hobsonville in Auckland could be fast tracked under the Auckland Housing Accord.

A group of six Hobsonville landowners have applied for a plan variation for 155ha of land that forms part of the Scott Point Special Housing Area.

If accepted, the plan would provide up to 3,000 new homes to be built on the land, including a mix of stand alone houses, terraced housing and possibly apartments.

It would also include open space, a neighbourhood centre and protected ecological zones.

The area is currently zoned Future Urban under the proposed unitary plan.

Because the proposed development is within a designated Special Housing Area, the planning and consent process for it is being fast tracked.

"Under the previous process it would have taken many years to reach this point," said David Clelland the growth and infrastructure manager and Auckland Council's Housing Project Office.

"We now expect the area to develop rapidly once a decision on the plan variation is made in the next six months."

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""Under the previous process it would have taken many years to reach this point,"
Hmm, and at a WACC of say 12% for a commercial concern, capital committed doubles every six years. 
Well, taking time out of the loop will certainly stop the interest-at-WACC compounding effect which the previous leisurely, adversarial and interminably long development consenting processes caused, to a large extent.
 
Now, at what building cost per square are these shacks to be - er - Erected?

One can only assume this will lead to more (un)affordable housing?! Fast track all you want...

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