Bank participation in 'social bonds' sought as govt looks to tackle social ills with private sector 'pay for performance' partners

Bank participation in 'social bonds' sought as govt looks to tackle social ills with private sector 'pay for performance' partners

By Gareth Vaughan

The Government is pushing ahead with a pilot scheme for social bonds - which it says are at the "cutting edge of public sector reforms" - and is courting banks, among others, to participate as investors.

The pilot is being run by the Ministry of Health, which will hold briefings for social service providers, and potential investors, in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch next month.

The Ministry says the pilot is an opportunity to test a "ground-breaking" way of delivering better social outcomes. Potential social issues that could be tackled via the pilot include; Improving health outcomes that can be linked with improving the quality of housing for vulnerable families; Reducing alcohol and drug use especially among young people; And reducing teenage pregnancy rates.

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1 Comments

Here we go - selling off the DHBs - good luck with that - the shambles in the UK formerly known as the NHS is proof we will end up with much the same.
 
I guess the likes of Infratil will be called upon to throw them [DHB services] under the bus.