PM Key unveils 'super ministry' merging Ministries of Economic Development, Science and Innovation, Dept of Labour, Building and Housing

PM Key unveils 'super ministry' merging Ministries of Economic Development, Science and Innovation, Dept of Labour, Building and Housing

The Ministry of Economic Development, Department of Labour, Ministry of Science and Innovation, and the Department of Building and Housing will all be merged to form the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, Prime Minister John Key announced today.

In a speech to the Auckland Chamber of Commerce, Key said the new department would help drive the government's priority of building a more productive and competitive economy.

The Ministry would be report to current Minister for Economic Development Stephen Joyce.

Meanwhile Key set ten "challenging" results targets for New Zealand's public service he said he expected to be achieved over the next three years, which fell within five themes: reducing long-term welfare dependency; supporting vulnerable children; boosting skills and employment; reducing crime; and improving interaction with the government.

Key also reaffirmed the government would set a new cap on the public service of 36,475 full-time equivalent positions. When National entered government it set a cap of 39,000 FTEs. Since then the number of FTE positions had fallen by around 2,400.

Super Ministry

"It will strengthen the public service's ability to work on business policy, regulation and engagement, so the Government will get a much more coordinated and focused resource," Key said of the new Ministry.

"And it will be easier for New Zealand businesses to engage with government, rather than dealing separately with a number of different agencies when they are seeking advice or support," he said.

Key said the new department would have around 3,200 employees at the outset, making it a similar size as the Ministry of Justice. The government had also asked for a due diligence report in April, which would provide detailed advice on implementation and transition.

The report would also include advice on the future location of some current functions of the Department of Building and Housing, such as social housing policy and the Tenancy Service.

"We’ve always said there is a high hurdle for structural change in the public sector. The benefits have to significantly outweigh the costs. A single business-facing department meets that test," Key said,

"It will help drive the Government’s priority of building a more productive and competitive economy. It will strengthen the public service’s ability to work on business policy, regulation and engagement, so the Government will get a much more co-ordinated and focused resource. And it will be easier for New Zealand businesses to engage with government, rather than dealing separately with a number of different agencies when they are seeking advice or support," Key said.

"Given our recent experience of bringing departments together – into the Ministry for Primary Industries, for example – we also expect to see efficiencies through reducing duplication and overlaps. It is our intention for current employees of the four departments to move across to the new Ministry on 1 July, and for there to be changes at the senior leadership team level," he said.

Agencies had been informed today and Chief Executives would be communicating this proposal with their staff.

"It is worth noting that other countries have also established single, business-facing government departments in recent years," Key said.

"The United Kingdom, for example, established the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills in 2009, and Australia last year established the Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education," he said.

"And I do want to say that this is the only departmental merger we are currently planning. I’m not ruling them out in the future, but there is no plan for wholesale reorganisation."

10 challenges

Key said the 10 challenges were not a wish list, but a to-do list:

Number one - I expect a reduction in long-term welfare dependency. In particular I want to see a significant drop in the number of people who have been on a benefit for more than 12 months. At the moment about 215,000 people are in that category, and that’s far too many.

Number two – I expect to see more young children, and particularly Maori and Pacific children, in early childhood education. That’s because all the evidence shows that time spent in early childhood education helps future learning.

Number three – I expect immunisation rates for infants to increase, and I want to see a substantial reduction in rheumatic fever cases among children.  These are important health issues for children and were part of our policy at the last election.

Number four – I expect a reduction in the number of assaults on children. Far too many children in New Zealand suffer abuse and assault, and that is simply not acceptable.

Number five – I expect more young people to come through the education system with a solid base of skills, whether they get those at school or at a tertiary institution. So I want to see an increase in the proportion of 18-year-olds with NCEA level 2 or an equivalent qualification. Good progress has been made in this area over the last few years, but I want to see even more.

Number six – I expect to see a more skilled workforce, with an increase in the number of people coming through with advanced trade qualifications, diplomas and degrees.

Number seven – I expect a reduction in the crime rate. And that doesn’t just mean total crime, it also means violent crime and it means youth crime. I want to see all these measures coming down.

Number eight – I expect a reduction in the rate of re-offending, from people who are in prison or serving a community-based sentence.

I also want to change the way government interacts with people and businesses.

Doing business with government, and getting information from government, should be easy.

We live in a world of social media, online sales, internet banking and apps for almost everything.

But the advances we see in the private sector – the sort people have come to expect – have not been picked up well by the public sector.

Part of that is technical. I’ve actually been shocked at how obsolete many public sector IT systems are, and how big the challenge will be to upgrade and modernise them.

The Government is already investing heavily in this area, as we are with ultra-fast broadband, and that will continue to ramp up over the next few years.

But we don't want to just tack new technology onto current business practices.

We are serious about creating a sharper sense of purpose, and that involves maximising the use of technology to provide better and faster services.

I want to see technology used to create a step-change in customer service.

So in addition to the eight results I’ve just mentioned, I want to see two more things.

Number nine – I expect to see a one-stop online shop for all government advice and support that businesses need.

And number ten – I expect to see transactions with government completed easily in a digital environment.

(Updates with Super Ministry quotes)

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But we'll still have a minister for racing right?

To tackle D. Shearer’s sensible economic strategy,  J. Key will smile and wave - opening a “$ 1’000’000 Balloon Festival” for an elite group, with more useless bureaucrats eating away tax- payers money.
 
We need politicians, who have a comprehensive understanding of economics vs. society, working in the interest of the wider, hard working NZpopulation. I cannot wait for a leadership change.
 

" an elite group, with more useless bureaucrats"... and D Shearer's old temple, the UN is any better?  look at the way they are dealing with Syria.. 

In comparison.
Chairman Moa – please read and listen : http://aotearoaawiderperspective.wordpress.com/2011/11/22/six-degrees-of-separation-or-how-close-is-john-key-to-the-key-players-in-the-global-banker-take-over/
 
I rather prefer D. Shearer a person with integrity – a great leader for New Zealand, working for our society.

I caught a bit of John Key on the radio on the way home yesterday and gee he sounds good. Sounds to me like he has got it all sorted, no problem at all. Almost had me convinced.

I read and I listened.. Unfortunately, it hasn't changed my perception on David Shearer and Labour.  I don't 100% agree with JK (and his party policies) buy hey we had a general election and I casted my vote.

i wonder if they will get superhero outfits.......with capes

Of course they must, it stands to reason.

I would expect the tender to supply said superhero outfits and capes will be won by an offshore company.

"...Key also reaffirmed the government would set a new cap on the public service of 36,475 full-time equivalent positions. When National entered government it set a cap of 39,000...."
Compared to Oz (150K positions) with a pop. of 5x NZ the cap needs to lowered al least another 5000 positions............

Does that 150k positions only included federal employees or also includes the state employees (like police and education) that are included in the NZ 36475?

?

This is the last throw from a dying ideology. Watch and weep.
 
No answers, but that's scarcely surprising, as the question wasn't asked inthe first place.
 
He gone, for (that's left of) all money. Up up, over the top, and down. Just like the gaussian curve which is the real problem, graph his political trajectory. And that of anyone who seeks to replace, until someone addresses the real issue.

Dear @JohnKey what are the limits to growth?
Given the finite amount of resources and the laws of physics and chemistry, rational people understand there is a limit to growth.  Please explain where government sees the limit, and how it reached this conclusion.
 
Regards
 
The next generation (The Brighter Future)

MoBIE doesn't seem to be a terribly logical grouping of departments.

Question to Mr Key
"Now we have Super Minister Joyce,how many of our $200k+ minsters can we expect to retire to the bank benches with their miniscule $150k pay packets?"
 

There is certainly some room for rationalisation in this list of Ministers that have some responsibility for the merged organisations once the Super Minister takes over.
17 seems a bit over the top
Ministry of Economic Development
Acting Minister for Economic Development
Acting Minister of Energy and Resources
Minister of Tourism
Minister of Commerce
Minister for the Rugby World Cup
Minister for Communications and Information Technology
Minister for Small Business
Minister for Regulatory Reform
Minister of Consumer Affairs
Minister for Canterbury Earthquake Recovery
Department of Labour
Minister of Labour
Minister of Immigration
Minister for Social Development and Employment
Minister for ACC
Department of Building and Housing
Minister for Building and Construction
Minister of Housing
Ministry of Science and Innovation
Minister of Science and Innovation
 

 Sounds good to me although not far enough, anyway it will all seem like too little too late in 5 to 10 years when we finally face the fact we are in a similar position to the PIGS and about to go belly up.
Anyhow much better than what the other lot would do, although hearing Shearer to day it sounds like they might be not far behind and finally waking up to the fact we have far to much debt and have a welfare dependency problem.  Seems like they would just have different methods of dealing with it.

And we pay people for this?
Sounds as though they made it up on the hoof.
Surely there would not be a consultant who would want to be associated with such tired  claptrap?

I worked for the Government once, never again, but it was a small ministry (just over 250 people) and was still so incredibly bureaucratic it was unbelieveable. A bigger Minsitry will not be better, just more bureaucratic with one arm not knowing what the other was doing. If John Key thinks:
"It will strengthen the public service's ability to work on business policy, regulation and engagement, so the Government will get a much more coordinated and focused resource," Key said of the new Ministry."
HE IS WRONG! To become a manager in central government you just have to be so bad you don't leave for ten years.

yet another "Super" organisation!!!
gee, I hope its a lot more effective than the "Super CIty" has been 
Apparently, the planning section at the Council is being restructured ALREADY

and he said he was going to cut Treasury in half...didn't he?....oh for .....

One thing only is certain...they will get super sized salaries to go with the capes and super new super big offices in a super costly new building...and the bloats at the top will get a car too and it will not be a Hybrid.......what a scam.....
Meanwhile the GST idiocy continues to murder the building sector in the regions...was it intentional?

Is this the "small goverment" people want? NO...not really.  NZ is so small that I'm sure one MP for each Island would be fine. Only takes a few to continue f***ing everything up surely? 

 
"Minister for Economic Development Stephen Joyce."
 
LOL..........lol......................lol.....................

 

What John Key announced today is a major change in direction. To reach the ten targets (or are they the ten commandments?) he is going to have to address the lack of jobs, attack poverty, provide better and accessible housing, stop people pissing off overseas, ensure good working conditions and pay for workers, invest in rehabilitation instead of vindictive lock 'em up, cancel the latest prison contract as it won't be needed.... Or maybe it is just another lot of sound-nice words.

Or maybe it is just another lot of sound-nice words
or sound-nice threats?  He seems to be getting impatient with the fact that we aren't a happy, contented 'paradise' by a long-shot and he blames everyone other than the "rulers" - hence the "rulers" minions are going to be expected to beat the unruly masses into shape.
 
And what's with this drive toward every pre-schooler needing early childhood education.  My goodness - my kids only started their 'education' at kindy age ... and they're fine!!!!  It's almost as if there is a 'push' for every family to have two-working adults as a minimum.  I guess if you intend to drive wages lower so we can 'compete' that's the only option?
 
Sounds like social engineering to me.  ECE - it wasn't even an acronym when my kids were young - and from what I can tell most of what ECE is - is "structured" play.  Yikes, as if child's play has to have a 'purpose'.

How many jobs will they cull with this?