ASB's parent Commonwealth Bank of Australia tipped to splash out up to A$3 billion on share buybacks despite expected increased New Zealand capital requirements

ASB's parent Commonwealth Bank of Australia tipped to splash out up to A$3 billion on share buybacks despite expected increased New Zealand capital requirements

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A cautionary tale for shareholders:

I think the way in which corporate management teams like JP Morgan’s have captured their compensation plans to enrich themselves at the expense of shareholders is a micro-version of the way in which Oligarchs have captured monetary policy and tax policy and trade policy and antitrust policy and securities policy to enrich themselves at the expense of citizens. Link

HT Andrewj

The same game that Helen Clark played. And the shareholders she was conning were the population of NZ!

As you point out, its probably related to executive bonuses; in essence nothing more than insider trading.

Remind me who are on the board of these banks? Couldnt possibly be ex bankster executives by chance?

I have always been of the opinion,and also told by others that a stock buy back was a good thing.

I think it's a very bad thing, but that's my opinion.

We work was a company that did do that. It gives a double whammy when it goes bad.

Very good for the board and senior execs, usually bad for shareholders

"From 2014 through 2018, Texas Instruments bought back 228.6 million shares for $15.4 billion. That works out to an average purchase price of $67.37.

Over that same time span, Texas Instruments sold 90.8 million shares to management and board members as they exercised options and restricted stock grants, for a total of $2.5 billion. That works out to an average sale price of $27.51.

The difference in average purchase price and average sale price, multiplied by the number of shares so affected, is the direct monetary benefit for management. This is true whether or not management sells their new shares into the buyback or holds them. That amount works out to be $3.6 billion."

https://www.epsilontheory.com/yeah-its-still-water/