Election 2011 - Party Policies - Health - Hospitals

Election 2011 - Party Policies - Health - Hospitals

Hospitals

Click here to return to the health summary.                   Click here to return to the policy homepage.

  • Doctors help patients make informed decisions (rather than serve the government).
  • Hospitals compete in the business of delivering high quality healthcare at competitive prices. (more here)

  • Hospitals regularly assessed against these guidelines laid down by the Healthcare Authority.
  • Review drug-induced diseases and deaths in hospitals and residential facilities with a view to improving quality assurance systems surrounding multi-drug use.
  • Ensure all hospitals and health services meet nationally consistent clinical safety standards including national infection control standards, to minimise the risks to patient safety.
  • Ensure all hospitals and rest homes have implemented nationally developed infection control standards and ensure ongoing national monitoring of these standards. (more here)

  • Labour will launch the Health Innovation Project to be led by the National Health Board to drive nationwide application of models of good practice in the delivery of health services.
  • Labour will launch the Health Innovation Project to be led by the National Health Board to drive nationwide application of models of good practice in the delivery of health services.
  • Labour will re-invigorate the primary healthcare strategy to ensure all New Zealanders have access to affordable primary healthcare, including after-hours care.
  • Labour will support the development of strong regional and/or national networks to make the most efficient use of health resources.
  • Support the development of national services, where appropriate, to deliver specialised care and encourage innovative practice.
  • Labour will review the capital charging regime as it applies to public hospitals.
  • Labour will ensure a coordinated hospital and specialist care system with consistent access criteria, quality and timeliness across New Zealand.
  • Labour will develop nationwide tools for elective surgery prioritisation based around timeliness, equity and quality.
  • Labour will develop a model of care for acute services that encompasses the needs of patients, primary care and hospital emergency departments.
  • Labour will develop sustainable and high quality palliative care services.
  • Labour will build and upgrade facilities across New Zealand to support the network of care across New Zealand.
  • Labour will strengthen the provision of ambulance services by instituting a staged plan to deal with funding, workforce, crewing and training issues. (more here)

  • Levy private health providers to contribute to the public health system where they transfer patients to maintain private profitability.
  • Eliminate institutional discrimination in the health system through greater ethnicity-based auditing, a more effective governance system, the expansion of Māori health provision, and health workforce development to address racism in health care workers and systems.
  • Introduce plain language information for users of health services to improve health literacy.
  • Include health care services for eyes, ears, and teeth within the subsidised primary health care system.
  • Eradicate third world diseases from New Zealand.
  • Support the development of a high quality public health system which is free and accessible for all New Zealanders. (more here)

Not set out on their website.

Not set out on their website.

  • Review the administrative and policy compliance burden facing hospitals and GPs to free up resources currently dedicated to management, which should be directed towards actually making people better.
  • Encourage the development of integrated electronic medical records and prescribing systems to reduce medical errors, remind patients and physicians about preventative and follow-up care, and facilitate the sharing of integrated records and information across sites of care. (more here)

 

 

We welcome your help to improve our coverage of this issue. Any examples or experiences to relate? Any links to other news, data or research to shed more light on this? Any insight or views on what might happen next or what should happen next? Any errors to correct?

We welcome your comments below. If you are not already registered, please register to comment.

Remember we welcome robust, respectful and insightful debate. We don't welcome abusive or defamatory comments and will de-register those repeatedly making such comments. Our current comment policy is here.