Anthony Healy, currently director of BNZ Partners, to succeed Andrew Thorburn as BNZ CEO

Anthony Healy, currently director of BNZ Partners, to succeed Andrew Thorburn as BNZ CEO

BNZ has named Anthony Healy, currently director of its business banking unit BNZ Partners, as its new managing director and chief executive officer.

Healy will succeed Andrew Thorburn effective May 12. Thorburn is moving to Australia to succeed Cameron Clyne, the outgoing CEO of BNZ's parent National Australia Bank.

BNZ hasn't wasted time in appointing Healy with Thorburn's move revealed as recently as April 3. He officially succeeds Clyne from August 1.

In a statement BNZ chairman John Waller said Healy's appointment is subject to formal Reserve Bank clearance.

“The board and I are very pleased that Anthony has accepted the offer of leading BNZ,” said Waller.

“In his four-and-a-half years as director of BNZ Partners Anthony has demonstrated the commercial leadership, vision and character required to step up and lead the company, building on a long and successful career in business and commercial banking around the world," Waller said.

“The BNZ board has a strong focus on succession and leadership planning, drawing on the quality of the senior people we already have working with us. The quick selection of Andrew Thorburn’s successor is testament to that process, and gives BNZ’s people clarity and certainty."

Waller said BNZ Partners had gone "from strength to strength" under Healy’s leadership, with BNZ achieving sustained success in agriculture and business markets. He also noted Healy had led BNZ's diversity programme.

Healy (pictured) is also a former CEO of ANZ's finance company UDC from December 2008 to November 2009. An Australian, he has a Bachelor of Science Degree, Graduate Diploma in Economics, and Graduate Diploma in Finance from the University of Melbourne. He has also been ANZ's head of business banking for New South Wales, and had two years as ANZ Grindlays Bank's deputy country head for Israel and the Palestinian Territories.

Healy also had a stint at Malaysia's Am Bank in 2007-08, including a role leading the bank's strategy and change agenda.

Along with BNZ's director of retail banking Andy Symons, Healy had a stint as acting CEO when Thorburn took extended leave during the summer of 2012-13.

Meanwhile, Healy was quoted saying he was "thrilled" to get the job.

“The time is right for me to step into this role and help BNZ to build on the core strengths it has developed over the past five-and-a-half years under Andrew Thorburn’s leadership," said Healy.

“Our investment in digital capability and technology platforms will enable us to keep meeting our customers’ needs. Our commitment to Maori business is a strong one, and our Asia strategy will keep our customers connected with emerging opportunities in a region whose importance to New Zealand will become ever greater in this century," Healy added.

BNZ said Healy's replacement as director of BNZ Partners would be announced in due course.

Here's some information on Anthony Healy supplied by BNZ

Joined Bank of New Zealand in November 2009.

Held a number of senior executive and director-level roles in an 18-year career in New Zealand, Australia, Asia and the Middle East.

Prior to joining BNZ, Anthony worked for ANZ group, most recently as CEO of UDC Finance and prior to that deputy group managing director of AmBank Group in Malaysia.

Also a director of AmBank’s investment bank, commercial bank, insurance company and funds management businesses.

Post graduate diploma in finance (University of Melbourne), 1994

Post graduate diploma in economics (University of Melbourne),

1990 Bachelor of Science, double major in economics & psychology (University of Melbourne), 1989

Married to Kate, with two children.

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