Cryptocurrencies are treated like property for tax purposes, the Inland Revenue Department says in new guidance

The following is a press release from the Inland Revenue Department.

Bitcoin, Ethereum, Ripple and Litecoin are some of the well-known examples of cryptocurrencies, which is essentially money that exists only in digital form.

The currency is usually encrypted using Blockchain technology that regulates the generation of new units and verifies fund transfers. It operates independently of any central bank and can be transferred without going through a bank.

Inland Revenue Customer Segment Leader Tony Morris, who oversees this work programme, says trading in cryptocurrencies may happen in a digital realm but tax obligations still apply in New Zealand.

“Inland Revenue has responded to requests for guidance by issuing some common questions and answers on our website so that everyone knows their responsibilities.

“Just like with property - when you acquire cryptocurrency for the purpose of selling or exchanging it, the proceeds you make from selling it are taxable.

“The purpose is hard to argue here since with Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, generally the only time they produce an income is when they change hands.”

Tax is also applied when one cryptocurrency is swapped for another. You don’t need to cash out to dollars to create a tax obligation.

Likewise, if you receive a cryptocurrency as payment for goods or services, this is considered business income and is taxable.

Tax rules for foreign exchange don’t apply when it comes to cryptocurrencies.

“It’s important to keep good records of your transactions as this information will be useful when filing a tax return,” says Mr Morris.

“Let Inland Revenue know if you think you haven’t got your past tax returns right so that it can be corrected.

“Operating in the digital world doesn’t absolve you from your tax obligations. It also doesn’t mean your activity is untraceable.”

Read the guidance here: www.ird.govt.nz/cryptocurrency

We welcome your help to improve our coverage of this issue. Any examples or experiences to relate? Any links to other news, data or research to shed more light on this? Any insight or views on what might happen next or what should happen next? Any errors to correct?

We welcome your comments below. If you are not already registered, please register to comment or click on the "Register" link below a comment.

Remember we welcome robust, respectful and insightful debate. We don't welcome abusive or defamatory comments and will de-register those repeatedly making such comments. Our current Comment policy is here.