Election 2011 - Party Policies - Transport

Election 2011 - Party Policies - Transport

Transport

Air Passenger Rail
Rail Freight Roads
Shipping  

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  • Push the next government to continue investing in transport infrastructure, where it can be shown that the benefits to people will exceed the cost of the project.
  • Push the next government to embrace proper pricing of transport, so that the users of transport pay the costs of their use rather than non-users paying the cost.
  • Push the next government to further streamline the Resource Management Act  so that transport infrastructure can be built for less cost with less delay.
  • Push the next government to invest in transport infrastructure that people want to use, regardless of whether it is rail, road, or air, regardless of ideological fads. (more here)

  • Our transport strategy is focused on:
  • Encouraging people to find alternatives for some car journeys.
  • Investing in rail and reconfiguring it to meet the needs of the 21st century.
  • Encouraging freight onto rail and coastal shipping, and off heavy trucks.
  • Changing the way we plan for transport so that we take full account of the environmental, social and economic consequences.
  • Changing the way we organise our cities, our working lives, our production and distribution to reduce the need for transport and encourage active modes. (more here)
  • Our Auckland Transport Plan is focussed on 3 key priorities:
  • Fast-tracking the CBD rail loop. Auckland rail needs investment for the future. We'll commit $1.4 billion (60% of the cost) to fast-track the CBD rail link so it starts construction within 3 years. This will mean more reliable, frequent and rapid train services for all areas of Auckland.
  • Improving bus and ferry services. We'll invest $500 million to improve our bus network over the next decade, helping to fund the cost of constructing North-Western and South-East busways. We'll also work with council to ensure buses become more reliable, convenient and affordable.
  • Safer walking and cycling and liveable communities. We'll work with council to develop a compact city with great urban design, more pedestrianised areas and liveable communities. We'll provide $30 million a year for new projects in Auckland such as cycleways and footpaths, and will support walking and cycling across the Harbour Bridge. (more here)

  • Labour will support the Auckland Council and back the clear preference for Auckland, which is the Rail Link proposal. We will provide funding, through the Land Transport Fund, for up to $1.2 billion, which equates to half of the cost of the Rail Link, on the understanding that the Auckland Council is responsible for financing the other half.
  • Labour will continue with intermediate improvements for the Wellsford-Puhoi Highway which will improve both safety and travel-times. We will not support the $1.7 billion, gold-plated proposal as is currently planned. (more here)

Not set out on their website.

  • We will reduce transport disadvantage, by shifting the focus of private car use to one where public transport, walking and cycling are core. We want to rebuild neighbourhoods, focus on community safety and be connected to our environment.
  • Improving urban design and broadband, so that people are less likely to have to travel, or can walk or cycle. (more here)

  • Work alongside Auckland Council and other stakeholders to evaluate further projects, such as the proposed CBD rail link and the third harbour crossing, against the following criteria: The benefits of the project compared to the costs of building it; The contribution the project will make to reducing congestion; That all options for achieving transport gains in an area are properly considered; That the proposed funding of the project is fair and equitable to the different types of transport users. (more here)
  • Invest around $620 million annually on road safety over the next three years, including $295 million a year on safety improvements and $300 million per year on road policing.
  • Rebalance speeding penalties in favour of demerit points and away from fines. Evidence shows that demerit points are more effective at changing driver behaviour than fines.
  • Keep improving our state highways with a $12.2 billion investment over 10 years. (more here)
  • Work with the Productivity Commission on its review of international freight transport costs, and evaluate and put in place practical recommendations that flow from that.
  • Evaluate four new RONS projects for development following final completion of the first three RONS projects.
  • Design and consent the Transmission Gully section of Wellington’s Northern Corridor (construction due to start in 2015/16). (more here)

  • UnitedFuture recognises that an efficient transport sector is an essential component of national infrastructure and well being. We will work towards an integrated national transport system that meets the needs of industry, commerce and the wider community at a reasonable cost. (more here)

 

 

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