AgResearch and Lincoln deal changes

AgResearch and Lincoln deal changes
Three months of investigation by CRI AgResearch and Lincoln University have identified that a partnership model would be preferable to a full amalgamation as it will be more cost effective and still achieve significant benefits for NZ. The two organisations will remain separate entities but focus on working much more closely together on a range of partnership initiatives. AgResearch and Lincoln University announced in March a combined consultative approach to investigate how they could work more closely to develop land-based research and education through investigating the option of a merger. The two organisations worked closely and effectively in identifying the opportunities a new entity might deliver and during this process it became clear the significant benefits to NZ could be most cost effectively delivered from a partnership rather than an amalgamation. A number of synergies and benefits of closer collaboration between the two organisations have been identified through the investigation process and it has been agreed to pursue a substantial partnership, the form of which will be agreed in the near future.  AgResearch Chairman Sam Robinson says the joint investigation of the benefits of Lincoln University and AgResearch working together has produced a better understanding of the respective capabilities, strengths and expertise of the two organisations. "We can see the potential for forming productive partnerships in postgraduate supervision, commercialisation activities, and extension teaching," he says. "Knowledge transfer, through a sustainable partnership particularly focused on technology adoption by the land-based sector is our best shared path for the future." Lincoln University Chancellor Tom Lambie says "We are looking forward to a closer working partnership with AgResearch. I believe this will still deliver significant benefits for the land-based sector."

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