Election 2011 - Party Policies - Canterbury Earthquake/EQC

Election 2011 - Party Policies - Canterbury Earthquake/EQC

This is where the parties stand on Canterbury's recovery from the earthquake.

Canterbury Earthquake Recovery and EQC

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Not set out on their website.

  • The recovery of greater Christchurch should be declared by Parliament to be an ‘issue of national significance’. A national conference should be convened in Christchurch shortly after the General Election, with political, corporate and civic leaders, supported by scientific advisers present, to consider the future recovery and rebuild of greater Christchurch.
  • The National Conference should, inter alia, consider the merit of rebuilding Christchurch on its present location, having regard to the basic features of land contour and composition, waterways, and climate. Following the Conference, Parliament should adopt a notice of motion that Christchurch should be rebuilt on its present location, while relocation of any areas should have regard for the preservation of productive land in western areas.
  • The Government should consider extending insurance cover to the municipal assets of greater Christchurch until private insurance is offered once more.
  • CERA and the CCC should jointly publish a report describing the relationship between the Recovery Strategy and the Recovery Plan, with particular attention to their operational interaction and the parallel milestones envisaged over the next decade (2011 to 2020) and adoption of a common terminology over geographic areas.
  • The CERA Act should be amended by Parliament to:
    (a) extend the Recovery Strategy and the Recovery Plan from 9 to 18 months, with a completion date for the Strategy of 30 June 2012 and for the Plan of 31 December 2012; and
    (b) stipulate a time-horizon for planning in the Strategy and Plan to extend, as appropriate, to 100 years, with identified milestones of 5, 20, and 50 years within that period. (more here)

  • Labour will purchase land sufficient for an initial tranche of 1,500 affordable properties to be made available for on-selling, at cost, to red zone homeowners.
  • Labour will ring-fence a maximum of $100 million from the Canterbury Recovery Fund as compensation for home improvements, made after the valuation date, not currently covered by the Government‟s offer. Compensation will be set at a maximum of $50,000 with a minimum of $5,000 and require proof of the amount spent on the improvement.
  • Labour will work with the private insurance sector to explore all options to kick-start the industry and resolve the existing gridlock.
  • As a last resort, Labour is prepared to intervene in the insurance market as a short term measure to give the confidence required to get the market functioning properly again.
  • Labour will commit $2 million to fund test cases, where Canterbury residents appear to have been unfairly treated by their insurer, to establish precedent and certainty on major issues.
  • Labour will establish an independent board between CERA and the Minister to depoliticise the approach to the recovery and strengthen the performance of CERA.
  • Labour will audit the heritage stock of Canterbury to identify what remains and what is most important to save. We will work with building owners and the Councils to retain and strengthen viable heritage buildings where feasible.
  • Labour will use youth unemployment to fill the critical shortage of skilled workers in Canterbury, including investing $87 million towards getting 9000 young New Zealanders off the dole and into apprenticeships.  (more here)
  • Labour will make EQC coverage universal by collecting levies through the local authority rates system.
  • Labour will increase the $100,000 cap on the EQC‟s liability – the new cap will be determined in consultation with the EQC and the insurance sector.
  • Labour will investigate altering the EQC levy to make it progressive, rather than a flat rate.
  • Labour will expand the insurance coverage of the Earthquake Commission to ensure that temporary accommodation assistance is covered when private insurance expires.
  • Labour will review the structure and operation of EQC to ensure the lessons of the Canterbury earthquake are used to secure the long-term reliability of the Commission.
  • Labour will make EQC coverage universal by collecting levies through the local authority rates system and update the rules on land cover.
  • Labour will increase the $100,000 cap on the EQC‟s liability – the new cap will be determined in consultation with the EQC and the insurance sector.
  • Labour will, in setting the new cap, require that the newly created Insurance Commissioner negotiates with insurance companies to make sure that private premiums are reasonable and reflect the Crown‟s taking on of more risk from natural disasters.
  • Labour will investigate altering the EQC levy to make it progressive, rather than a flat rate.
  • Labour will review the structure and operation of EQC to ensure the lessons of the Canterbury earthquake are used to secure the Commission‟s long-term reliability. (more here)

Not set out on their website.

Not set out on their website.

  • $5.5 billion [for the] Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Fund to provide certainty for rebuilding Canterbury.
  • EQ Bonus to help Kiwis fund the recovery and provide investors with a new savings option.
  • 4500 places for construction-related training, including 1500 new places worth $42 million.
  • $25 million for CERA over two years to help the authority lead the rebuild.
  • $10 million for social service agencies and counselling support for Cantabrians rebuilding their lives. (more here)

Not set out on their website.

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