Budget 2013- Summary of all spending plans

Budget 2013- Summary of all spending plans

This table outlines the New Zealand Government's planned spending for the 2013/14 budget year.

Actual spending for the previous four years is on the left.

The numbers are drawn together from data released by the Minister of Finance on May 16, 2013.

Links to the primary sources used, from Treasury's website, can be found at the bottom of the page.

Click on any heading to drill down to what makes up these numbers.

Figures for each allocation are in millions of NZ$.

Actual
2009/10
Actual
2010/11
Actual
2011/12
Actual
2012/13
  Budget
2013/14
%
NZ$m NZ$m NZ$m NZ$m   NZ$m  
    618.0 2,286.1  Cant. Earthquake Authority 260.4 0.3%
 113.8  123.7 120.8    Industrial relations    
      158.5 Veterans Affairs - Defence    
208.4  215.9 208.1    Immigration    
479.4 1,577.2 945.2 235.0  Energy 196.2 0.2%
194.1 219.2 218.2 214.4  Special Interests 233.9 0.3%
49.4 272.0 179.7 343.5  Communications 334.3 0.4%
459.3 489.5 380.4 398.1  Arts & Culture 362.8 0.4%
334.6 412.8 457.7 498.7  Treaty of Waitangi 422.6 0.5%
      900.6  Primary Industry 1,087.9 1.3%
737.6 789.1 776.5 800.3  Science & Research 927.3 1.1%
      663.4  Economic Development 626.2 0.8%
1,075.3 1,618.2 1,019.9 1,085.3  Housing 1,112.4 1.3%
962.0 997.0 1,013.7 940.0  Foreign Policy 1,072.1 1.3%
1,000.2 1,157.4 1.275.5 1,070.9  Government 1,027.1 1.2%
814.6 897.0 887.7 947.7  Environment 773.2 0.9%
      1,449.1  Labour 1,448.8 1.7%
964.5 1,072.5 1,019.7    Industry    
1,194.9 1,197.1 1,190.0 1,165.2  Justice 1,188.4 1.4%
2,858.6 3,007.3 2,882.2 2,983.0  Law & Order 3,140.8 3.8%
3,299.9 3,078.5 3,039.0 2,825.4  Defence 3,354.6 4.1%
3,490.5 3,479.1 3,911.4 3,726.9  Transport 4,046.2 4.9%
11,719.6 13,568.4 10,841.7 11,559.5  Customs, Finance & Tfr's 11,502.8 13.9%
11,770.4 12,078.8 12,028.1 12,406.6  Education 12,644.5 15.3%
12,722.2 13,329.3 13,613.0 13,983.1  Health 14,655.0 17.7%
21,718.3 22,807.0 22,872.6 21,522.8  Social Welfare 22,399.4 27.0%
======  ======  ======  ======  =================  ======  ------ 
$76,053.8 $78,944.4 $79,499.1 $82,163.9  Total Expenditure $82,817.1 100.0
$191,798 $200,234  $208,467 $213,844  GDP (nominal, per RBNZ) $227,892 E
39.7% 39.4% 38.1% 38.4%  Govt spending - % of GDP 36.3%
and this compares with taxes collected as follows:        
$55,899.4 $58,189.5  $62,100.6 $65,383.9  Total tax collected $69,651.9  
        (click on this link for details)    
             
Not all the difference between tax collected and expenditure needs to be borrowed. The Crown has other sources of revenue than tax. The biggest single reason is that significant portions of National Super payments are pre-funded in the Super Fund.

Sources: You can download the data behind these tables from the Treasury website here »

We welcome your help to improve our coverage of this issue. Any examples or experiences to relate? Any links to other news, data or research to shed more light on this? Any insight or views on what might happen next or what should happen next? Any errors to correct?

We welcome your comments below. If you are not already registered, please register to comment.

Remember we welcome robust, respectful and insightful debate. We don't welcome abusive or defamatory comments and will de-register those repeatedly making such comments. Our current comment policy is here.

1 Comments

Comment Filter

Highlight new comments in the last hr(s).

Craig,
Thanks for posting all this data.
I note your summary line:
Not all the difference between tax collected and expenditure needs to be borrowed.
The following link debunks the idea that it all must be borrowed; or at least notes that it can be borrowed from yourself as the government.
http://www.mediaroots.org/can-the-usa-really-run-out-of-dollars/
So we should absolutely look at each budget line, and decide whether that is an efficient and sensible use of the country's resources. But balancing isn't necessarily the first priority.
The paper points out an economic truism that a government deficit must equal a private surplus, minus the leakage offshore in the current account.
This equation tells us that in New Zealand, if we have a fiscal deficit of roughly $12 billion; and a current account deficit also of roughly $12billion, the private balance must be about zero. If we reduce the government deficit to zero, while leaving the current account at negative $12 billion, then privately there has to be dissaving of $12 billion.
If we are serious about deficits as a country, then, the one to go after is the current account. All of the current National government settings are about increasing the current account deficit. It's the single biggest reason they need to change. 
The paper has the following quote:
“Mark Twain said, ‘It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you into trouble. It’s what you know for sure that just aint so.’
I actually quite like Bill English. But he "knows stuff that just ain't so". And that's getting us all into lots of trouble.